Support Hunting Conservation Organizations, Support Wildlife for Everyone

We must stand tall, stand together, and do everything we can to promote hunting for all the reasons it's become such an important part of our daily lives. 

 Dall sheep hunting is a challenge, and a passion of ours. Fair chase and respect all the way.

Dall sheep hunting is a challenge, and a passion of ours. Fair chase and respect all the way.

This week has been eye opening. The PETA Facebook frame made quite a splash with our hunting friends, many quick to slam the organization by posting their favorite hunting pictures. While it offered a 10 second feeling of satisfaction for the hunter, it offered the despicable animal rights organization a treasure trove of photos to misuse for years. 

And they will misuse, abuse and downright lie about these photos. They have no concept of the conservation efforts that surround our traditional hunting practices. The population management, the habitat protection, and the amazing opportunity to put wild free range lean meat in the freezer for our family - these are but a few of the facts behind these photos.

 A chilly October caribou hunt with the boys, rewarding, fun and filled the freezer.

A chilly October caribou hunt with the boys, rewarding, fun and filled the freezer.

Hunters are the reason we have some of the best managed wildlife populations in the US. We are funding the future of our wildlife in this country, without support from PETA or any other anti-consumptive use organization. While the ESA was created for a good cause, it's used and abused by anti-hunters, and we all must remain vigilant and involved in the public comment process. 

 Taking good care of our meat is an integral part of the hunt. Having free range, non GMO wild lean meat in our freezer is essential. On top of the mountain or at home, there is no better feeling. Proud to be hunters.

Taking good care of our meat is an integral part of the hunt. Having free range, non GMO wild lean meat in our freezer is essential. On top of the mountain or at home, there is no better feeling. Proud to be hunters.

I want to personally thank Outdoor Life for stepping in quickly, putting out some great hunting facts that we should all study and think about. The following is from their courageous post from August 24th.

All Hunters

  • Each year, nearly $200 million in hunters' federal excise taxes are distributed to state agencies to support wildlife management programs, the purchase of lands open to hunters, and hunter education and safety classes. Citations listed below.

  • Sportsmen contribute nearly $8 million every day, adding more than $2.9 billion every year for conservation.

  • Hunters and target shooters have paid more than $7.1 billion in excise taxes for conservation since the inception of the Pittman-Robertson Act in 1937.

Deer Hunters

  • Modern day regulated hunting has restored whitetail deer numbers back to what it was prior to European colonization. In 1900, less than half a million whitetail deer remained in the U.S. because of market hunting and poor management. Thanks to conservation programs and modern hunting, the whitetail population has reached some 32 million.

Waterfowlers

  • For every $25 federal duck stamp purchased, $24.50 goes goes directly to buy and lease wetland habitat on national wildlife refuges. Anyone who hunts waterfowl must purchase a stamp.

  • The purchase of federal duck stamps by waterfowl hunters has raised more than $800 million since 1934 to protect some 5.7 million acres of habitat for birds and other wildlife.

  • More than 300 national wildlife refuges were created or have been expanded using federal duck stamp dollars. At least one refuge in nearly every state has benefited from duck stamp dollars. Anyone who hunts waterfowl must purchase a stamp.

4. Take someone hunting: Even if their filters aren’t actively raising money, PETA’s campaign is designed to raise awareness about the “horrors” of hunting. So if you really want to get back at them, let’s build our ranks. The more non-hunters we introduce to what hunting is really like, the better. Show a non-hunter that hunting is rooted in sound conservation practices and fair-chase ethics. Show them that it’s about community, the great outdoors, and, yeah, fun.

5. Get involved: If you’re still riled up after all that, consider joining a conservation or hunting organization that works on habitat conservation and policy efforts. Don’t have the money? Try volunteering in your area to restore habitat or become a hunter education instructor. —N.K.

Need some ideas? Visit our "Take Action" page today. Support causes and businesses that stand up for your rights, your freedoms and your beliefs. 

Get outdoors and breathe some of that fresh clean air, clear your head, and have an amazing day!